Describe how aspects of a behavioural phenotype can interact with the environment to cause challenging behaviour

A behavioural phenotype is a pattern on behaviours that are presented in syndromes caused by chromosomal or genetic abnormalities. Challenging behaviour is an umbrella term that encorporates all behaviours presented by a syndrome that cause harm or discomfort to the person or the other people around them trying to care for them. When these challenging… Continue reading Describe how aspects of a behavioural phenotype can interact with the environment to cause challenging behaviour

Why does depression have such a profound effect on parenting? What are the mediators and moderators of the relationship between depressed mood and parenting behaviour.

Depression is a mental health disorder that effects 1 in 10 people. It involves symptoms of low mood, loss of self worth, adheonia, guilt and loss of motivation in life. This can be severly harming in parenting for several reasons such as these symptoms mediating negative parenting behaviours already associated with negative child outcomes. Parents… Continue reading Why does depression have such a profound effect on parenting? What are the mediators and moderators of the relationship between depressed mood and parenting behaviour.

People with insecure attachments to their own parents (or romantic partner) are more than likely to have problems with parenting

Attachment is a concept that was first devised by Bowlby in the 1960’s. Attachment is the bond that is formed between a parent and child, for both the mother and the father. Originally Bowlby described this as a phenomenon that only was disrupted by a mothers absense but this was devised to include fathers once… Continue reading People with insecure attachments to their own parents (or romantic partner) are more than likely to have problems with parenting

In what ways may executive function be necessary for Theory of Mind, and what evidence do we have that it is not always necessary?

Executive Function is the term used to explain higher abilities of  a human or non-human such as managing time and planning that are said to be developed in the Frontal Lobe. For this reason it was once suggested that animals did not have Executive Functions as their Frontal Lobe was not as developed as a… Continue reading In what ways may executive function be necessary for Theory of Mind, and what evidence do we have that it is not always necessary?

Discuss the evidence for and against the claim that in terms of their higher cognitive functions of causality the differences between human infants/ children and human adults are greater than those between non- human animals and adult humans

In terms of the higher cognitive function literature, 3 groups of subjects are of high interest and are researched in order to understand the difference and how similar their abilities may be. First of all higher cognitive functions refer to the abilities that are not innate but have been adapted or learnt through evolution. Causality… Continue reading Discuss the evidence for and against the claim that in terms of their higher cognitive functions of causality the differences between human infants/ children and human adults are greater than those between non- human animals and adult humans

Non-human animals “are bound to a present that is defined by their current motivational state” (Suddendorf and Corbalis, 1997). Discuss the evidence for and against this claim. What are the implications of this claim for our evaluation of human understanding about time?

The claim that nonhuman animals are bound to a present that is defined by their current motivational state draws upon the debate about whether non-human animals have an understanding of time. Time is defined by four different points; remembering the past, planning/ speculating about the future, comparisons about places in time and structuring those experiences… Continue reading Non-human animals “are bound to a present that is defined by their current motivational state” (Suddendorf and Corbalis, 1997). Discuss the evidence for and against this claim. What are the implications of this claim for our evaluation of human understanding about time?